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How To Have An Attention-Grabbing LinkedIn Header

How To Have An Attention-Grabbing LinkedIn Header

 

Who are you according to your LinkedIn profile? Jane Smith, MBA [from who cares which University]? John Wilson, Manager at [unknown organization]? Sorry, but you’ve got to do better than that to stand out! You’ll find about–um –maybe a gazillion of headers like that on LinkedIn and you’ll just “blend into the masses”. If LinkedIn is used for online presence and seeking best opportunities, then why the “oh-so-boring” titles?

 

Your LinkedIn headline is the first thing a prospective employer sees in the search results. Sure, you can include the keywords “professor” or “manager” in it, but you’ve got to be more creative than that to drive opportunities or expand your professional network! Otherwise, you’ll be just like the other bunch of generic “professors” or “managers” at just-another university or corporation…

 

So, here’s a how-to guide on making your LinkedIn headline the kind that will make anyone absorbed into your online profile or resume for that matter.

 

1)      Think like a Recruiter: Who do you want most to see your profile? Recruiters! Then, imagine them in mind and tell them what they want to hear about you. Research a bit about the qualities a recruiter would look for in yourspecific profession, if you have to. If you have those qualities, write them. Part of being able to get the attention of recruiters is by knowing how to sellyourself to them.

 

Here’s an example: 20+ years of experience as a Social Media Marketer driving successful campaigns on a shoestring budget. 500%+ ROI in the past 6 months!

 

2)      Be specific: Simply stating that you are a “Professor”, a “Social Media Strategist” or a Professional Assignment Writer makes you one of the many common Profs and Online Marketers out there. Recruiters would only utter “so what”, and move to the next applicant. In order to get their attention you have to be more specific. What really is it that you can do,or have accomplished? Even your profession could be turned into a catchy, specific header if you describe it more.

 

Instead of saying you are a Professor at [University] you can say:

 

“Ardent Professor whose passion lies in stimulating the young minds through knowledge communication”

 

3)      Be Creative: Remember creative is always appreciated. Once you’ve caught the eye, you are highly likely to be further investigated and contacted. Along with the keywords, maintain the creative spark. Spice up the header a bit by something unusual.

 

For example: A Geeky, Sci-fi loving, Tech Specialist working for [Company]

 

4)    Don’t Skip the Keywords: Just because you want to be creative and catchy doesn’t mean you skip the keywords. So, again: DO not skip the keywords! There is no rule (currently) that says that keywords don’t matter. They always have! Clearly, a recruiting agent who’s doing his research in the LinkedIn search box will use specific words based on qualification, experience, Universities, etc. Therefore, it is highly important thatyou need to have those important keywords (words that define you or your position) in your LinkedIn header!

 

Think about how you would search yourself if you were the employer. Make sure those keywords are a part of your title. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean that you can stuff unnecessary or inappropriate words in for the sake of covering as many keywords as possible. Incorporate only those keywords that are important and highly searched by the recruiters.

 

Remember having a wide network of professionals isn’t the only thing that can get you the golden job opportunities that you’ve always been waiting for. It is the attraction, appeal and engagement in your profile or portfolio that can get you there, at the forefront of the competition.

 

Written By Ashley Sanford – Ashley offers expert writing guidance to students from the platform of Peak Dissertation. She’s also a passionate blogger with a core interest in career program and consultation.